Partners

  • Geriatric Assessment Unit of St. Mary’s Hospital
  • McGill University
  • International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), Université de Montréal

Context

The presence of multiple comorbidities in a single elderly patient is one of the major challenges with which hospitals are confronted. It is important to respond to the specific needs engendered by this plethora of morbidities due to the increasing number of geriatric patients. Music has the potential to play a role in the delivery of healthcare treatments. In the case of patients presenting with a serious neurocognitive condition (previously referred to as dementia), several studies have demonstrated that the presence of music can improve cognition, particularly spatial and temporal orientation, episodic memory, and working memory. It has also been demonstrated that music can improve quality of life, reduce depression, and be used in the treatment of anxiety. It is an interesting fact that some studies have also demonstrated that a single session of music therapy is sufficient to positively effect relaxation. We have previously demonstrated that music reduces the risk of falls geriatric patients, potentially by improving mood. Moreover, it has also been shown that depression is a significant risk factor in relation to falls, and that treatment for depression reduces the risk of falling. As such, it is reasonable to consider that musical intervention may indirectly improve mobility by improving patients’ emotional state and positive mood.

 

Objective

> To determine whether geriatric patients admitted to a treatment unit and participating in musical sessions report increased and/or improved emotions when compared to a control group.

 

Actions

  • Preparation of the research protocol
  • Submission to the Ethics Committee
  • Formulation of a data collection sheet
  • Prospective analysis of the data collected
  • Statistical data analysis
  • Preparation of a report on the study